This is not a snake.  Its a glass lizard, but…honestly, it looks like a snake to me.  Anyway, my boys liked it.

A lot. Too much for my taste.  …boys creep me out inspire me.

This post is about photography because I’m really frustrated with my camera situation.  These photos were shot with an Olympus E-3 that I got from eBay a few months ago.  It came with the 12-60mm lens which, by the way, I dropped and now has to be sent off to customer service for repair.  I love Olympus cameras, but this E-3 just isn’t impressing me as much as I thought it would.  I like the grip, I like that its built like a tank (when I dropped the camera and lens, the camera just sort of laughed at me.  The lens…not so much.)  I still have my E-620…and I think I’ll go back to shooting with it more.  Its lighter and…its lighter.

Jill: you told me so.

I wish I wish I wish I could shoot with the new E-5.  And I also wish my 12-60mm lens would miracle itself healed.

What system do you shoot with?  Why do you like it?  What would you change?  What’s your dream system?

Cheers, fellow writers of light!  Happy clicking.  🙂

And don’t forget to to enter my “Hip Girl’s” giveaway!  You have until tomorrow night at midnight to enter; I’ll be announcing the winner on July 1st.

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5 thoughts on “Here, Lizard, Lizard, Lizard

  1. That does look like a snake and it is pretty creepy. I have a Nikon D3000. I love it but I have nothing to compare it against as it is my first digital SLR camera.

  2. Ok, that thing is super creepy! lol I have just a regular digital camera. I’m sure there are amazing things i could do with it, but I have yet to learn them… maybe that will be my next project! 🙂 You inspire me to take interesting pictures.

    And… I’m super excited about the drawing tomorrow! 🙂

  3. We’re actually on the hunt for a new body, but because we use our camera primarily for astro and night photography we are finding the jump a bit daunting after having used our old Rebel for the job happily for some 6 odd years and field-testing cameras that just don’t handle the niche well. I think we’re going to go with a 60D, and perhaps even just the 40D knowing that a lot of astrophotography buffs swear by it, but only after I talk the hubs out of going full-frame (which is our dream kit, but the thought of having to replace all our lenses makes my wallet hurt).

    1. Wow…do you have a photostream on Flickr or anything? I’d love to see your photos. The closest I’ve come to “astro” photography is using my tripid to photograph the moon. What I’d LOVE to try, though, is the time delay photography, where the stars seem to stream around the earth or shoot across the sky. While my husband was in Iraq, the photographer assigned to their unit took wonderful photos using slow shutter speed and a flashlight to get the stars as well as the faces of the guys pulling security. He uses a Nikon…uh…the one that’s crazy-expensive and paired it with insane-expensive lenses. …of course, the Army paid for it, so, you know… I have hard-core photography crushes on a lot of the military photographers. 🙂

      I like the Olympus line, with the 4/3 system, but I’ve heard/seen wonderful things from the full-frame set, too. I think I’m partial to Olympus b/c its what I started with and I really, really like the zuiko lenses.

      Thanks for commenting!

      1. http://www.flickr.com/photos/bwpcoax/

        The hubs’ account. He really enjoys the long exposure shots – http://bit.ly/k6daBA – and loves light-painting. We have a kit full of gels and flashlights for nights when we go out star-watching, and it isn’t a money sink if you already have some basic outdoor gear to handle the elements. There are some *really* good books and Creative Night by Harold Davis is one of the best (although I have a bundle more suggestions if you are interested).

        Warning…he is basically a social media void and doesn’t quite understand that flickr is more a place for the post-production photos to be displayed instead of the free-for-all dumping ground he treats it like, so feel free to dismiss the underlit and fragments of stacking sets that he inexplicably has up. I am still on my astrophotography learning curve, so I don’t have any processed photos that I’m happy with yet mostly because I lack a computerized telescope mount that tracks so I’m stuck with fast shots (lots of photos of details on the moon, so that is cool).

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